Welcome Guest Login or Signup
LIVE CHAT | BOOKMARK US | LANGUAGE:
 

GORT51
PROFILE   GALLERY   BLOGS   GUESTBOOK   FRIENDS   FAVORITES   VIDEOS  
 
THE ORIGINAL "THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL" TRIBUTE PAGE!

mem_normal2 OFFLINE
Male
103 years old
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Profile Views: 420
[ 18038 ]

Referrals: 0



MEMBER SINCE: 12/22/2010
STAR SIGN: Capricorn
LAST LOGIN: 07/16/2011 04:19:10

No gifts received yet.




















THE FOLLOWING FIVE CLIPS ARE EXCERPTS FROM THE MOVIE:



KLAATU ARRIVES (1951)













GORT ATTACKS (1951)














STUPIDITY (1951)


















WITCH DOCTOR (1951)

















KLAATU BARADA NIKTO (1951)

















THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL MUSICAL TRIBUTE!















DEDICATED TO FORRY ACKERMAN AND JAMES WARREN!
















BEHIND THE BIG SCREEN DOCUMENTARY PART ONE!!








PART TWO!















THE CAPTAIN WITH FORMER CHILD STAR BILLY GRAY AT CON III 2010. HE TOLD ME THE SCI FI CLASSIC REALLY HOLDS UP WELL TODAY."I CAN'T BELIEVE IT'LL BE 60 YEARS OLD IN 2011."






Date of Birth
25 August 1909, Bradford, Yorkshire, England, UK


Date of Death
10 June 1971, Harrogate, Yorkshire, England, UK (emphysema)


Birth Name
Eric Alexander Rennie


Height
6' 4" (1.93 m)


Mini Biography


The British actor Michael Rennie worked as a car salesman and factory manager before he turned to acting. A meeting with a Gaumont-British casting director led to Rennie's first acting job - that of stand-in for Robert Young in Alfred Hitchcock Secret Agent (1936) . He put his film career on hold for a few years to get some acting experience on the stage, working in repertory in York and Windsor. Afterwards, he returned to films and achieved star status in I'll Be Your Sweetheart (1945). In 1951, he was brought to Hollywood by Darrel Zanuck at 20th Century Fox, cast in arguably his most popular role as Klaatu in The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), now considered a science fiction classic. After that he worked as a supporting actor for eight years until his return to England in 1959. At that time, he took the lead role of Harry Lime in the television series "The Third Man" (1959). Throughout his career, he made numerous guest appearances on television, particularly on American programs.
IMDb Mini Biography By: Lyn Hammond



Spouse
Maggie McGrath (1947 - May 1960) (divorced) 1 child
Joan Phyllis England (1938 - ?) (divorced)


Trivia


Michael Rennie joined the Royal Air Force in 1941, training as a fighter pilot in the United States under the Arnold Plan. While at Napier Field, Dothan, Alabama for his advanced flight training he was asked by fellow trainee, Scotsman Jack Morton, what he did in civilian life. Rennie told Morton and the other pilots gathered around that he was a movie actor. They stared at him in disbelief then broke out in a chorus of laughter. A couple of nights later Rennie and his classmates went into town to watch a movie, "Ships with Wings". Not long into the movie, and much to the surprise of those seated with him, Michael Rennie appeared on the screen as Royal Navy Pilot "Lt. Maxwell"

Did not begin to actively pursue acting until age 29. Living a rather wanderlust life prior to this, he was once a car salesman, but quit after a year when he couldn't sell even one car. Was also a manager of a rope factory for his uncle.


Close friends during his 20th Century-Fox years with Tyrone Power and appeared in a few of his pictures, including The Black Rose and I'll Never Forget You.


Once married to British actress Margaret (Maggie) McGrath, who later went by the stage name of Maggie Rennie. They had one son, David, born 1953.


Graduated from The Leys (a private school in the city of Cambridge). Despite his lean build, he excelled in sports (rowing, fencing, cricket, boxing, wrestling, swimming).


Son of James Rennie (not the actor), who operated a century-old wool mill, and Edith Dobby Rennie. His great-great grandfather, named John Rennie, designed and built New London Bridge.


Lived his final years in Geneva, Switzerland and died at his mother's home in England while visiting because of his brother's death.


A heavy smoker, Rennie had respiratory problems for many years. During the run of the Broadway comedy "Mary, Mary" in the early 60s, Rennie had to visit the hospital several times. His voice was dubbed in the 1968 movie The Battle of El Alamein due to his chronic health problems.


In his best known film, the classic sci-fi The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), a scene was cut that showed his even-tempered alien character Klaatu in an emotional state.


Appeared in The Thirteenth Letter (1951) for director Otto Preminger, who later named Rennie as a third party to his countersuit of adultery against his wife during divorce proceedings in 1958.


His early career was interrupted by war service. He was a flight instructor for over two of those years.


Rennie was connected with the Titanic twice on screen. In 1953, he was the uncredited, off-screen narrator for Jean Negulesco's film "Titanic." Thirteen years later, in 1966, he played the role of Titanic Captain Edward J. Smith (misidentified in the credits as Malcolm Smith) in the pilot episode of the TV series "The Time Tunnel." Ironically, this episode used tinted stock footage from the earlier film to tell the story of two time travelers who found themselves aboard the doomed ship.


His son David Rennie, is now a UK High Court judge on the Lewes, Sussex circuit.


He had a second son, John Marshall Rennie, with longtime companion Renee Gilbert Taylor. Professionally, his son went by John M. Taylor.



Patricia Neal (January 20, 1926 – August 8, 2010) was an American actress of stage and screen. She was best known for her roles as World War II widow Helen Benson in The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), wealthy matron Emily Eustace Failenson in Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), and middle-aged housekeeper Alma Brown in Hud (1963), for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress.
Neal was born Patsy Louise Neal, in Packard, Whitley County, Kentucky, to William Burdette and Eura Petrey Neal.She grew up in Knoxville, Tennessee, where she attended Knoxville High School,and studied drama at Northwestern University. In later years, she became Roman Catholic.
After moving to New York, she accepted her first job as understudy in the Broadway production of The Voice of the Turtle. Next she appeared in Another Part of the Forest (1946), winning a Tony Award as Best Featured Actress in a Play, in the first presentation of the Tony awards.
In 1949, Neal made her film debut in John Loves Mary. Her appearance the same year in The Fountainhead coincided with her on-going affair with her married co-star, Gary Cooper. By 1952, Neal had starred in The Breaking Point, The Day the Earth Stood Still and Operation Pacific, starring John Wayne. She suffered a nervous breakdown around this time, following the end of her relationship with Cooper, and left Hollywood for New York, returning to Broadway in a revival of The Children's Hour, in 1952. She also acted in A Roomful of Roses in 1955 and as the mother in The Miracle Worker in 1959. In films, she starred in A Face in the Crowd (1957) and co-starred in Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961).
With Andy Griffith in A Face in the Crowd (1957)
In 1963, Neal won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in Hud, co-starring with Paul Newman. When the film was initially released it was predicted she would be a nominee in the supporting actress category, but when she began collecting awards, they were always for Best Leading Actress, from the New York Film Critics, the National Board of Review and a BAFTA award from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts. Three years later, in 1965, she was reunited with John Wayne in Otto Preminger's In Harm's Way winning her second BAFTA Award.
Neal was offered the role of Mrs. Robinson in The Graduate (1967), but turned it down, feeling it came too soon after her three 1965 strokes. She returned to the big screen in The Subject Was Roses (1968), for which she was nominated for an Academy Award.
She later starred as Olivia Walton in the television movie The Homecoming: A Christmas Story (1971), which was the pilot episode for The Waltons. Although she won a Golden Globe for her performance, she was not invited to reprise the role in the television series; the part went to Michael Learned. (In a 1999 interview with the Archive of American Television, Waltons creator Earl Hamner said he and producers were unsure if Neal's health would allow her to commit to the grind of a weekly television series.) Neal played a dying widowed mother trying to find a home for her three children in a moving 1975 episode of NBC's Little House on the Prairie.
In 1978, Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center in Knoxville dedicated the Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center in her honor. The center serves as part of Neal's advocacy for paralysis victims. She appeared in Center advertisements throughout 2006.
In 2007, Neal worked on Silvana Vienne's innovative critically-acclaimed art movie Beyond Baklava: The Fairy Tale Story of Sylvia's Baklava, appearing as herself in the portions of the documentary talking about alternative ways to end violence in the world. Also in 2007, Neal received one of two annually-presented Lifetime Achievement Awards at the SunDeis Film Festival in Waltham, Massachusetts. (Academy Award nominee Roy Scheider was the recipient of the other.)
She often appeared on the Tony Awards telecast, possibly because she was the last surviving winner from the first ceremony. Her original Tony was lost, so she was given a replacement by Bill Irwin when they presented the Best Actress Award to Cynthia Nixon in 2006.
In April 2009, Neal received a lifetime achievement award from WorldFest Houston on the occasion of the debut of her film, Flying By. Neal was a long-term actress with Philip Langner's Theatre at Sea/Sail With the Stars productions with the Theatre Guild.
In her final years she would appear in a number of health-care videos, including The Healing Influence.
During the filming of The Fountainhead (1949), Neal had an affair with her married co-star, Gary Cooper, whom she had met in 1947 when she was 21 and he was 46. By 1950, Cooper's wife, Veronica, had found out about the relationship and sent Neal a telegram demanding they end it. Neal became pregnant by Cooper, but he persuaded her to have an abortion.[7] Shortly after the abortion, Cooper punched Neal in the face after he caught Kirk Douglas trying to seduce her.
The affair ended, but not before Cooper's daughter, Maria (now Maria Cooper Janis, born 1937), spat at Neal in public.[9] Years after Cooper's death, Maria and her mother Veronica reconciled with Neal.
Neal met British writer Roald Dahl at a dinner party hosted by Lillian Hellman in 1951. They married on July 2, 1953, at Trinity Church in New York. The marriage produced five children: Olivia Twenty (April 20, 1955 – November 17, 1962); Chantal Tessa Sophia (b. 1957); Theo Matthew (b. 1960); Ophelia Magdalena (b.1964); and Lucy Neal (b. 1965). Her granddaughter Sophie Dahl is a noted actress and model.
In the early 1960s, the couple suffered through grievous injury to one child and the death of another. On December 5, 1960, their son Theo, four months old, suffered brain damage when his baby carriage was struck by a taxicab in New York City. On November 17, 1962, their daughter, Olivia, died at age 7 from measles encephalitis.
While pregnant in 1965, Neal suffered three burst cerebral aneurysms, and was in a coma for three weeks. Dahl directed her rehabilitation and she subsequently relearned to walk and talk ("I think
I'm just stubborn, that's all"). On August 4, 1965, she gave birth to a healthy daughter, Lucy.
Neal and Dahl's 30-year marriage ended in divorce in 1983 after Dahl's affair with Neal's friend, Felicity Crosland.
In 1981, Glenda Jackson played her in a television movie, The Patricia Neal Story which co-starred Dirk Bogarde as Neal's husband Roald Dahl.
Neal's autobiography, As I Am, was published in 1988.
Neal died at her home in Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, August 8, 2010, of lung cancer at age 84.[1] She had converted to Catholicism four months before her death and was laid to rest in the Abbey of Regina Laudis in Bethlehem, Connecticut.




Displaying 2 out of 2 comments
04/05/2018 11:52:53



ORANGE1



Zaczarowana_roza_kl270_163040



ORANGE1



Bajeczna_kraina_II_kl271_163042



ORANGE1



Zakochance_kl269_163039



ORANGE1



Bajeczna_kraina_II_kl271_163042



ORANGE1



Dama_w_czerwonym_kapeluszu_kl268_163038



ORANGE1



Bajeczna_kraina_II_kl271_163042



ORANGE1



Zalotniki_kl272_163043



ORANGE1



Just
stoppin' by to wish you a wonderful day on your end friend...Much love
sent your way!



k31u2b_th



04/04/2018 22:17:02



Floral-_Flourish-_Frame-2



Sytuacja3_np260_163045



405-1



Sytuacja2_np259_163044



291_buddha_statue_cutout_01_by_tigers_stock-d41u3tg



Hello 
sorry I've been gone so long on here, it's been crazy the last few
months. I'm trying to get my life on track since my husband passed away.
Things are slowing down a bit, but only a bit. Just wanted to take a
moment here and say hello friend. Hope all is well on your end. Have a
wonderful night and much love sent your
way!




*** MyBoomerPlace.com ***