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"DEDICATED TO THE MEMORY OF CLAYTON MOORE"

mem_normal2 OFFLINE
Male
103 years old
Brooklyn, New York
United States
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MEMBER SINCE: 12/17/2010
STAR SIGN: Capricorn
LAST LOGIN: 08/14/2012 01:47:15

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HI YO SILVER THEME!







ENTER THE LONE RANGER-EPISODE ONE (1949)










THE LONE RANGER FIGHTS ON-EPISODE TWO (1949)












THE LONE RANGER'S TRIUMPH-EPISODE THREE (1949)
















HIGH HEELS-EPISODE TEN (1949)









SIX GUN'S LEGACY-EPISODE ELEVEN (1949)










RETURN OF THE CONVICT-EPISODE TWELVE (1949)









THE LONE RANGER'S CREED!!!

1. I believe that to have a friend, a man must be one.
2. That all men are created equal and that everyone has within himself the power to make this a better world.
3. That God put the firewood there, but that every man must gather and light it himself.
4. In being prepared physically, mentally, and morally to fight when necessary for that which is right.
5. That a man should make the most of what equipment he has.
6. That "this government, of the people, by the people, and for the people," shall live always.
7. That men should live by the rule of what is best for the greatest number.
8. That sooner or later... somewhere... somehow... we must settle with the world and make payment for what we have taken.
9. That all things change, but the truth, and the truth alone lives on forever.
10. I believe in my Creator, my country, my fellow man.





THE LONE RANGER GETS HIS STAR ON THE WALK OF FAME.











HEADLINE NEWS ON THE DEATH OF CLAYTON MOORE (1999)















http://www.beverlywashburn.com
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BEVERLY WASHBURN AND CLAYTON MOORE IN LONE RANGER CLIP (1956)



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I'M A RETIRED/ DISABLED VETERAN WHO NEVER MARRIED. I JUST NEVER FOUND ANYONE WHO SHARED MY PASSION FOR POP CULTURE.NOSTALGIA BUFFS KNOW ME AS CAPTAIN CELLULOID®™ I'M A SPONSOR/FAN OF MOVIE AND TV RELATED EVENTS IN THE NEW YORK CITY AREA. I'M CREDITED WITH HAVING BOTH ORIGINAL LOIS LANES, NOEL NEILL AND PHYLLIS COATES, APPEAR IN THE BIG APPLE FOR THE VERY FIRST TIME 2006-08. IT'S JUST A WAY OF KEEPING OUR MEMORIES OF THAT POPULAR 1950S TV SERIES ALIVE. I LIKE TO THANK THE SUPERMAN HOMEPAGE, SUPERHERO FANSITE, FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE, THE GEEK CALENDAR, TCM, TVLAND, KGO RADIO'S JOHN ROTHMAN, MOEBANSHEE'S LAIR, HOWARD STERN, ASSOCIATE MOVIE PRODUCER EVAN GINZBERG (THE WRESTLER), THE NEW YORK DAILY NEWS WEBSITE, NY1 NEWS, CLASSIC IMAGES, AND LOCAL TV AND RADIO LEGEND JOE FRANKLIN FOR PROMOTING MY EVENTS THROUGH THE YEARS. YOU ROCK!

Actor. Born Jack Carlton Moore, on September 14, 1914, in Chicago, Illinois. Moore changed his name to "Clayton" when he arrived in Hollywood in 1938. As a onetime model and circus performer (he worked as a trapeze artist), Moore worked his way through the ranks as a stunt actor before graduating to small acting roles and finally to leading roles in various Saturday afternoon serials, such as Dick Tracy Returns, in the late 1930s and 1940s.

In 1949, Moore won the starring role in one of the first shows to be filmed exclusively for television, a TV version of the radio program The Lone Ranger that aired on the fledgling ABC network. Aided by his trusty horse, Silver, and by Tonto (Jay Silverheels, who died in 1979), the faithful American-Indian sidekick who famously referred to the black-masked Lone Ranger as "kemo sabe," Moore provided a maverick force of law and order for the tremendously popular show's colorful version of the Old West. Though he was briefly replaced with another actor from 1952 to 1954, during a contract dispute, Moore returned to complete the show's run until 1957, when it was cancelled.

Though he appeared in approximately 70 feature films, Moore never forgot the role of his life; to the contrary, he continued to wear a black mask in all public appearances until 1979, when the producers of a new film version of The Lone Ranger obtained a court order forcing him to refrain from donning the trademark mask. He replaced it with a pair of wraparound sunglasses. The movie, released in 1981, turned out to be a flop, and the courts gave Moore the right to wear his mask again in 1984. In a 1985 interview with the Los Angeles Times, the actor told a reporter: "Once I got the Lone Ranger role, I didn't want any other. I like playing the good guy."

Moore, who was largely retired by the 1990s, lived in Calabasas, California, near Los Angeles. His first wife, the former actress Sally Allen, died in 1986. The couple had one daughter, Dawn Moore Gerrity. On December 28, 1999, Moore died of a heart attack, at age 85; he was survived by his daughter and his second wife, Clarita.

© 2008 A&E Television Networks. All rights reserved.



PERILS OF NYOKA TRAILER (1942)



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THE CRIMSON GHOST (1946) CHAPTERS 1 CHARLES QUIGLEY, LINDA STIRLING, AND CLAYTON MOORE AS HENCHMAN ASH.


Watch The Crimson Ghost Episode 1 in Entertainment | View More Free Videos Online at Veoh.com




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Familiar Canadian Indian actor who shot to fame as Tonto, the faithful Indian companion of the masked man on the US television series "The Lone Ranger (1949)_. A member of the Mohawk tribe, he excelled at wrestling, horse racing, football, boxing, and hockey, and became a renowned lacrosse player. With the help of actor Joe E. Brown, Silverheels obtained work as a stuntman and extra in Hollywood films. Following military service in World War II, Silverheels returned to film work and began landing small, often stereotypical roles as Indian warriors in Westerns. John Huston used him as one of the fugitive Osceola brothers in Key Largo (1948), and Silverheels followed this with the two roles that would define his career, Tonto and the Apache leader Geronimo, whom he would play several times beginning with the Western classic Broken Arrow (1950). His enormous fame as Tonto overshadowed everything else he did, though it did not prevent him from playing other parts to noticeable effect. Even after the end of "The Lone Ranger" (1949) series, he continued to be called upon to reprise Tonto for commercials, comic guest spots, and spoofs. He became an outspoken activist for Indian rights as well as a respected teacher within the Indian acting community. He appeared several times on talk and variety shows performing his own poetry. In later years, he played fewer parts of importance and began a second career as a harness racer. His health failed in the late Seventies and he died of a stroke in 1980, a beloved figure to the Baby Boom generation America. His son, Jay Silverheels Jr. has acted in television as well.
















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