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A Salute To Those Classic Warner Brothers Gangster Movies.

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Gangster Actor Who Knew His Renoir From His Kostabi
Edward G. Robinson was born Emmanuel Goldenberg on the 12th December 1893 in Bucharest, Romania. He arrived in the United States, in New York's Lower East Side, at age 10. He took up acting while attending City College, abandoning plans to become a rabbi or lawyer.
He was elected to the Elizabethan Society. He attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts on a scholarship, and, in 1913, began appearing in summer stock after changing his name to "Edward G." (for Goldenberg). Robinson debuted on Broadway in 1915, and, over the next 15 years, became a noted stage character actor, even co-writing one of his plays, The Kibitzer (1929). He appeared in one silent film, The Bright Shawl (1923), but not until the sound era did he begin working regularly in films, making his talkie debut in The Hole in the Wall (1929) with Claudette Colbert.
It was a later sound film, 1930's Little Caesar, that brought him to the attention of American audiences; portraying gangster boss Rico Bandello, he established a prototype for a number of gangster roles he played in the ensuing years. After being typecast as a gangster he gradually expanded the scope of his roles, and, in the '40s, gave memorable "good guy" performances as in a number of psychological dramas; he played federal agents, scientists, Biblical characters, business men, bank clerks, among other characters.
The actor experienced a number of personal problems during the '50s. He was falsely linked to communist organizations and called before the House Un-American Activities Committee (eventually being cleared of all suspicion). Having owned one of the world's largest private art collections, he was forced to sell it in 1956 as part of a divorce settlement with his wife of 29 years, actress Gladys Lloyd. Robinson continued his career, however, which now included television work, and he remained a busy actor until shortly before his death from cancer in 1973. His final film was Soylent Green (1973), a science fiction shocker with Charlton Heston.
Two months after his death, Robinson was awarded an honorary Oscar "for his outstanding contribution to motion pictures," having been notified of the honor before he died. Incredibly, he had never even nominated for an Academy Award before then! He was also the author of a posthumously published autobiography, All My Yesterdays (1973).
He was a stocky, forceful, zesty star of Hollywood films who was best known for his gangsters roles in the '30s. A "little giant" of the screen with a pug-dog face, drawling nasal voice, and a snarling expression, he was considered the quintessential tough-guy actor.
Interred at Beth El Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York, USA, in the Goodman Mausoleum.





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James Cagney was born in the Yorkville section of Manhattan, N.Y.. His father
was a bartender and amateur boxer. The latter, something the young Cagney
developed a life long passion for. As a youth, he had a fine reputation as a
fighter. He entered show buisness just after World War 1. A fellow employee at
Wanamakers told him a troupe of vaudevillians where auditioning singers and
dancers, and paying $35 a week. Cagney auditioned, and although he could neither
sing or dance, he got the job!
Cagney stayed in vaudeville until 1929, when he moved to Broadway to star with
Joan Blondell in 'Penny Arcade'. This got him and Blondell an offer to go to
Hollywood for screen tests, winning him the role in the 1930 film 'Sinners Holiday'.
Although a very accomplished and versatile actor, Cagney is usually remembered as
the tough guy and gangster. A role he portrayed phenomenally in such movies as
'Angels With Dirty Faces', 'Public Enemy', 'White Heat' and 'The Roaring Twenties'.
In 1942 he had the chance to change personae. He made the movie 'Yankee Doodle
Dandy', in which he starred as George M Cohan. This enabled him to show off his
dancing skills and won him an academy award. He and his brother Bill, formed their
own production company once 'Yankee Doodle' was completed. Cagney made four
films under it's umbrella between 1943 - 1946 when he returned to Warner Bros.
1961 saw Cagney retire from the movies. He moved to his 800 acre ranch in
Dutchess County, N.Y. with his wife, Frances ('Bill') Willard Cagney. They had
married in 1921, and remained together until his death. Cagney enjoyed his retirement,
he was able to relax, read, play tennis, swim, paint, and write poetry. A far cry from
his gangster image. He did come out of retirement for enough time in 1980, to make
'Ragtime' with his old friend Pat O'Brian.
The lure of Cagney's portrayals, is that his own persona seeps through to the
character. However superficially, violent, brutal or downright nasty, it had an
underlying sensitive and sympathetic side. He was the boy gone bad, who, with the
right breaks, could havemade good; they rarely came. An excellent example is 'Angels
With Dirty Faces'. Cagney,the 'brave' gangster and murderer, is hero worshipped by
the 'Dead End Kids.' At the endof the film and about to be executed, he remains
defiant. Making him a bigger hero with the youths. His life long friend, now a priest,
implores him, 'for the sake of the boys', to feign cowardice. Thus he would lose face
with them, hopefully, preventing them from following his example. Still defiant, he
goes forhis final walk along the corridor to the electric chair. We cut to the shadow
of him being strapped into the chair. He is struggling, screaming and crying, 'I don't
want to die! I don't want to die!' Finally going to his death a coward. We never do find
out if it was for real or for the boys.
Cagney was a master of improvisation too. How can anyone who's seen it, forget the grapefruit in Mea Clarke's face (Public Enemy). It was scripted as 'Slaps her with an omelette'! Or the emotionally charged scene in 'White Heat', where he crawls into his mother's lap. Both scenes are examples of Cagney's spontaneity.






Displaying 8 out of 28 comments
10/18/2018 19:07:56



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The
Eyes are Watching Me

I bought a new
house in the small town of Winthrop. The house was cheap,
but the most important part was that I needed to get away from the
city. A few months ago, I had a run-in with a stalker. While I had
managed to get him arrested, I couldn't shake the feeling of eyes just
constantly watching me. I felt like there were eyes everywhere, at home
and on the street, so I decided to move out into the country to
somewhere with less people, just for peace of mind.The house itself was
big and somewhat old, but otherwise very welcoming. The agent who
introduced me to the house had been required to mention that a serial
killer had lived here in the past, which was why the house was so cheap.
However, he, and later, my next door neighbor Sarah, both told me to
pay the thought no mind. Four other owners had lived in the house since
then, and all of them were very happy with it.I loved the house. Its
interior furnishings were beautiful and very comfortable. The people of
Winthrop were friendly, often bringing over freshly baked pastries or
inviting me over for dinner. "Get-togethers," they said, "were the key
to making sure everyone who lived in Winthrop loved it there."Yet after a
week, I stopped "loving it." The feeling of someone watching returned,
worse than before. I tried to ignore it, but soon I started losing
sleep. Giant bags grew under my eyes and I began yawning almost as much
as I breathed. Sarah was kind enough to let me stay in her house for a
few nights.It was during this time that I heard the legend of Forrest
Carter, the serial killer who had lived in my house. While no one knows
his exact kill count, Carter, also known as the Winthrop Peacock, was a
man with extremely severe case of narcissism. Legends say that he
couldn't fall asleep if he didn't feel like he was being watched. He was
finally arrested for putting up a scarecrow to watch him during the
night. Only it wasn't a scarecrow. Carter had murdered a 17 year old
girl, just so her corpse could stare at him.The story gave me shivers,
and after I went home, I felt like there were hundreds of pairs of eyes
just watching me no matter how I turned.Today, however, was the first
day that I acted out. I was cooking breakfast, when I felt the eyes.
Instinctively, out of fear, I threw my kitchen knife, which lodged
itself into the wall. As I pulled it out, I found myself staring at a
pair of eyes, pickling in formaldehyde.I've been watching the police
peel away the drywall of my house for hours now. So far, they've found
142 pairs of eyes in little glass jars. The scariest thing is, each and
every one was staring at me.



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Stoppin'
by with a little tale to close out the day...Have a wonderful evening
on your end dear friend...



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10/18/2018 14:19:38



Enjoy your day~Hugs Lorribelle54



10/18/2018 08:21:06


10/17/2018 16:40:58



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Fifty-Cent
Piece

There is a story told in Troy
and Albany about a couple returning
home from a trip to New England. They were driving home in a carriage,
and were somewhere near Spiegletown when the light failed and they knew
they would have to seek shelter for the night. The husband spied a
light through the trees and turned their horse into a small lane
leading up a hill. A pleasant little house stood at the crest, and an
old man and his wife met the couple at the door. They were in
nightclothes and were obviously about to turn in, but they welcomed the
travelers and offered them a room. The old woman bustled about making
tea and offering freshly-baked cakes. Then the travelers were shown to
their room. The husband wanted to pay the old couple for their lodgings,
but the old lady shook her head and the old man refused any payment for
such a small service to their fellow New Yorkers. The travelers
awoke early and tiptoed out of the house, leaving a shiny fifty-cent
coin in the center of the kitchen table where the old couple could not
miss it. The husband hitched up the horse and they went a few miles
before they broke their fast at a little restaurant in Spiegletown. The
husband mention the nice old couple to the owner of the restaurant and
the man turned pale. "Where did you say that house was?" he asked. The
husband described the location in detail. "You
must be mistaken," said the restaurant owner. "That house was destroyed
three years ago by a fire that killed the Brown family." "I don't
believe it," the husband said flatly. "Mr. and Mrs. Brown were alive and
well last night." After
debating for a few more minutes, the couple and the restaurant owner
drove the carriage back out of town towards the old Brown place. They
turned into the lane, which was overgrown with weeds, and climbed the
hill to the crest. There they found a burned out shell of a house that
had obviously not sheltered anyone for a long time. "I must have
missed the track," said the husband. And then his wife gave a terrified
scream and fainted into his arms. As he caught her, the husband looked
into the ruin and saw a burnt table with a shiny fifty-cent piece lying
in the center.



4us2



Stoppin'
by with a short tale to end the day...Have a wonderful evening on your
end dear friend...



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10/17/2018 11:47:17




       
       
       
       




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Stoppin'
by with another great classic...Have a great day dear
friend...



10/16/2018 21:33:06



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The
Accident

It was one a.m. and Guy
Halverson sat in his dark living room. He hadn't
moved for over an hour. The accident earlier that evening kept playing
over and over in his mind. The light turned red, but he was in a hurry
and accelerated. An orange blur came from his right, and in a split
second there was a violent jolt, then the bicyclist rolled across his
hood and fell out of sight on the pavement. Horns blared angrily and he
panicked, stepping on the gas and screeching away from the chaos into
the darkness, shaken and keeping an eye on his rearview mirror until he
got home.Why did you run, you idiot? He'd never committed a crime before
this and punished himself by imagining years in jail, his career gone,
his family gone, his future gone.Why not just go to the police right
now? You can afford a lawyer.Then someone tapped on the front door and
his world suddenly crumbled away beneath him. They found me. There was
nothing he could do but answer it. Running would only make matters
worse. His body trembling, he got up, went to the door and opened it. A
police officer stood under the porch light."Mr. Halverson?" asked the
grim officer.He let out a defeated sigh. "Yes. Let me —"I am terribly
sorry, but I'm afraid I have some bad news. Your son's bike was struck
by a hit and run driver this evening. He died at the scene. I'm very
sorry for your loss.



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A
bit of a twisted tale tonight...Be careful out there on your end
friend...



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10/16/2018 15:56:24




       
       
       
       


10/15/2018 20:38:32



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Good night & sweet dreams dear friend...




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