Welcome Guest Login or Signup
LIVE CHAT | BOOKMARK US | LANGUAGE:
 

Beatleboy
PROFILE   GALLERY   BLOGS   GUESTBOOK   FRIENDS   FAVORITES   VIDEOS  
 
1-2-3

mem_normal2 OFFLINE
Male
104 years old
All♥yOu♥NeEd♥iS♥LoVe, Ohio
United States
Profile Views: 74704
[ 94778 ]

Referrals: 1
Who referred me: honeys0sweet

 


MEMBER SINCE: 09/25/2013
STAR SIGN: Libra
LAST LOGIN: 03/17/2019 18:13:46

From:
kaylou
From:
Private
From:
marlino24
From:
Marlene


01/31/18 Below are just a few of the words or phrases that sorta irk me for some reason, although there are PLENTY more!
01/20/18 Hey Kids, it's the Cold & Flu Season! Have you had your flu shot?
08/14/17 Which of these do you fear most?
06/01/17 Do you make your bed every day?
11/28/16 Hershey's chocolate kisses were named for the sounds the machines made during production. What year were they first introduced to the public?









Displaying 8 out of 3743 comments
03/21/2019 11:00:42

Lucinda
Lewis was born in 1817 and married William Henry Dogan on April 6,
1842. They had 8 children before his death in 1854. Her home, Peach
Grove, burned in 1860, and she and 6 of her children moved into an
out-building on the property, the old overseer’s house. A frame
addition was brought from another location on the 200-acre Peach Grove
estate and added creating a 2 room 1 ½ story house with a fireplace in
the center. The Dogan property was located in the village of Groveton.

On Sunday, July 21, the 1st Battle of Manassas commenced just down the
road from her home, and she could see the fighting and could see the
advance of the troops and hear the Rebel yell. As the battle raged, she
loaded a wagon with casks of water and provisions and had it driven to
the battlefield by her servant with orders that it be distributed to
soldiers in distress, regardless of which uniform they wore.
During
the battle some Union stragglers approached her home and asked for water
and food, and she told them yes, but they had to lay down their arms
firs. They complied and remained at her home until the next day. At that
point, she turned them over as prisoners, possibly the first person to
capture prisoners of war.
A year later in August 1862, the 2 armies
moved close to the Dogan house, and part of Jackson’s command bivouacked
on her property. Capt. Blackford, an engineer on Gen Stuart’s staff,
visited the home and filled his canteen with buttermilk, which he shared
with the staff officers. Gen. Ewell rode up and asked for some too, but
it was gone, and the Capt offered to return to the house to obtain
more. As the Capt and his men approached, they could see horses tied up
and through the glass, could tell it was Yankees. They swept in and
captured 4, obtained buttermilk, butter, eggs, and fried ham and
returned to Gen Ewell with the prisoners and supplies.
Lucinda
received a visit from an officer of General Jackson, informing her that
another battle would be fought in the vicinity and asked her family to
leave for their safety. Not longer after they left, Federal troops took
up position on her property. When they returned, Lucinda recalled,
“Funeral parties of both armies were burying the dead…..Doctors were
cutting off legs and arms and the moaning was awful…The children and I
took buckets of water out into the fields and we worked that day and
into the night, doing what we could for the poor fellows.”
After the
War, Lucinda was recognized by veterans of both armies as a ministering
angel on the battlefield, called The Belle of the Battlefield.

Lucinda died at the age of 9
Lucinda
Lewis was born in 1817 and married William Henry Dogan on April 6,
1842. They had 8 children before his death in 1854. Her home, Peach
Grove, burned in 1860, and she and 6 of her children moved into an
out-building on the property, the old overseer’s house. A frame
addition was brought from another location on the 200-acre Peach Grove
estate and added creating a 2 room 1 ½ story house with a fireplace in
the center. The Dogan property was located in the village of Groveton.

On Sunday, July 21, the 1st Battle of Manassas commenced just down the
road from her home, and she could see the fighting and could see the
advance of the troops and hear the Rebel yell. As the battle raged, she
loaded a wagon with casks of water and provisions and had it driven to
the battlefield by her servant with orders that it be distributed to
soldiers in distress, regardless of which uniform they wore.
During
the battle some Union stragglers approached her home and asked for water
and food, and she told them yes, but they had to lay down their arms
firs. They complied and remained at her home until the next day. At that
point, she turned them over as prisoners, possibly the first person to
capture prisoners of war.
A year later in August 1862, the 2 armies
moved close to the Dogan house, and part of Jackson’s command bivouacked
on her property. Capt. Blackford, an engineer on Gen Stuart’s staff,
visited the home and filled his canteen with buttermilk, which he shared
with the staff officers. Gen. Ewell rode up and asked for some too, but
it was gone, and the Capt offered to return to the house to obtain
more. As the Capt and his men approached, they could see horses tied up
and through the glass, could tell it was Yankees. They swept in and
captured 4, obtained buttermilk, butter, eggs, and fried ham and
returned to Gen Ewell with the prisoners and supplies.
Lucinda
received a visit from an officer of General Jackson, informing her that
another battle would be fought in the vicinity and asked her family to
leave for their safety. Not longer after they left, Federal troops took
up position on her property. When they returned, Lucinda recalled,
“Funeral parties of both armies were burying the dead…..Doctors were
cutting off legs and arms and the moaning was awful…The children and I
took buckets of water out into the fields and we worked that day and
into the night, doing what we could for the poor fellows.”
After the
War, Lucinda was recognized by veterans of both armies as a ministering
angel on the battlefield, called The Belle of the Battlefield.

Lucinda died at the age of 93, at her home and was buried at the Dogan
family cemetery, which was located near the original Dogan home, which
burned in 1960.
3, at her home and was buried at the Dogan
family cemetery, which was located near the original Dogan home, which
burned in 1960.

Image may contain: 1 person, text


03/21/2019 10:18:52






03/21/2019 10:17:24

Good morning sweet one ! xoxo's








03/21/2019 10:14:11



03/21/2019 10:12:54


Watch the Miracle of Transformation as brown,  , dead winter becomes vibrant, living springtime, and know that your soul will thus bloom again...Have a Magical Day! Angel Blessings and Love... Carole Anne..



03/21/2019 10:02:21

Hello my dear friend,

 Wish you a good day and a beautiful end of week.  Happy spring !!  At soon   Hugs & kisses  



03/21/2019 09:55:45

Confidence a word that can work miracles.


~ Unknown ~










03/21/2019 09:52:57






*** MyBoomerPlace.com ***